Mailbird And Bitwarden Ring In The Changes

bitwardenmailbird

Mailbird and Bitwarden are two major services that cropped up on my radar at the latter end of 2021.  To be fair, I have known about Mailbird for many years and was a regular user and championed it on my old Web2 And More blog. I transferred my fickle allegiances to Postbox until recently I discovered that it was hiccoughing on the Protonmail account.  Emails were not being sent and received emails that I found on the browser version were missing.

I had written a blog post here on Mailbird, I downloaded and installed the software and configured it for my then four email accounts and applied to play around with the alpha version and was granted access. One of my bugbears of the older versions I used was that syncing and retrieving emails was a bit sluggish. The alpha version surprised me in that syncing and retrieving was now so much faster and I felt it should be called TurboBird.

Setting up email accounts was so much easier, too. Services such as Gmail only required a username and password and the software automatically set up everything else that was required. The IMAP accounts were also simplicity itself to set up.

Mailbird is pretty much unique in that it enables users to incorporate a wide range of third-party apps such as Facebook, Twitter, Whatsapp, Dropbox, Google Calendar, Asana, Todoist and many more. This is one area that needs expanding. For example, you can integrate Evernote but not Nimbus which is rapidly catching up if not overtaking Evernote.  Similarly, Mailbird can link to Dropbox and Google Drive but not OneDrive. These are gaps that need closing. I can understand the Mailbird devs not incorporating every request for obscure services, but these are mainstream packages.

One positive addition has seen Grammarly incorporated as a spellchecker. This means you can customise your checks via your Grammarly account rather than rely on the generical checkers used by most services.

There are some other minor niggles but no game-changers. For example, it would be useful to set sync times per account, so I can check the important ones every minute or so and the less important ones every ten minutes.  Also, I would like the opportunity to change the icons and positions in the taskbar.

The second major change for the latter part of the year was changing from 1Password to Bitwarden. I have been a premium 1Password for many years but recently the browser extensions have been all but useless. I had lengthy email conversations with the support team, but these did not resolve the issue.  I recall a post I picked up via Flipboard covering Bitwarden. I downloaded it and ran it in parallel with 1Password for some weeks and wrote a review about it.

I read that others were experiencing the same problems on a 1Passsword sub/Reddit and there were other changes being implemented that were not finding favour among long term users so I knew things had to change.  I had looked at Dashlane many years ago, and a quick download and revisit showed me why I had not continued with it.

So, with a heavy heart, I opted out of 1Password despite my subscription having almost a year to run. I also subscribed to the premium version of Bitwarden as the service is open source and I felt it right to help the dev team.

Edited to add: I have now deleted my 1Password account. After many years as a premium user, adios.

What is Mailbird? – YouTube